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  September 12, 2004

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Virtual Humans Proposed As Space Travelers - Space.com  "In a sense, our space probes are a kind of virtual human," Plantec told SPACE.com after speaking at the 5th Annual Telluride Tech Festival, held here August 13-15. "They are very sophisticated. They have to make decisions on their own…not many, but some. It’s a very primitive stage of virtual human technology," he said. It’s likely that extraterrestrial civilizations might send surrogate entities our way. 
ET write home  - Nature  Left:  The Voyager 1 and 2 probes carry this gold-plated disc containing sounds and images from Earth.  A new analysis has concluded that a physical object would be a more efficient way to send a long message to the stars than a beam of radio waves. So while we scour the heavens for radio broadcasts from other worlds, we should also search our planetary backyard for a parcel of alien information, says Christopher Rose, an electrical engineer at Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey, who argues his case in this week's Nature1. "Communication by the transmission of matter once seemed ridiculous compared to using radiation, but it's not, and we should be looking for both," Rose says. He thinks that a stable orbit around Jupiter, or on the Moon or even the Earth could all be potential mailboxes - all locations occupied by the alien monoliths in Arthur C. Clarke's novel 2001.

A Novel Method For Studying Ancient Life Forms - SpaceDaily  Reporting in the August 23 edition of the journal Geology, California Institute of Technology geobiology graduate student Tanja Bosak and her coauthors describe their success in growing calcite crusts in the presence and absence of a certain bacterium in order to show that tiny pores found in such rocks can be definitively attributed to microbial presence. The new results show that there is a definite link between microbes and micropores. "We were primarily interested in directly observing how the microbes disrupt the crystal growth of the carbonate rocks," adds Bosak. The micropores in the study tend to be present throughout the crystals, and they not only mirror the shape and size of the bacteria, but also tend to form characteristic swirling patterns. If the micropores had been formed by some kind of nonliving particles, the patterns would likely not be present.
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Alzheimer's Disease:

Biosciences:
9/12/2004: Clone doctor took parents' cash for experiments ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: Scarce insects duck UK splat test
  - BBC

Climate, Environment:
9/12/2004: Environmental damage to be counted in GDP ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: Rights panel slams pollution study ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: State Secrets: Environmentalists say secretive state procedures are closing the doors for public comment on pr ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: European Water Directive: Optical sensors detect minute amounts of pollutants ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: Government to tackle Pancevo pollution problem ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: Scientists to Study N.Y. Organic Farmers - ABC
9/12/2004: Open the floodgates: EU funds are reversing the damage done to British wetlands  - BBC

Computers:
Devices
9/12/2004: Review: A Laser-Guided Computer Mouse - ABC
9/12/2004: Women take a shine to video games  - BBC
9/12/2004: Brits spending millions on games  - BBC
9/12/2004: Have Your Say: Is gaming the future of entertainment?  - BBC
9/12/2004: Hitachi drive to connect with consumer devices  - BBC

Communications
9/12/2004: Games giant muscles in on mobiles
  - BBC
9/12/2004: Phone fight against home violence
  - BBC
9/12/2004: Verizon Wireless opens global phone to consumers
  - BBC
9/12/2004: City of Brotherly Love may embrace Wi-Fi
  - BBC
9/12/2004: Wi-Fi group backs brawnier security standard
  - BBC
9/12/2004: Philadelphia mulls wireless society
  - CNN

Technology
9/12/2004: Dual cores to lead Intel show  - BBC

PC's
9/12/2004: IBM, Intel open up their 'blades'  - CNN
9/12/2004: Apple builds on its core  - BBC
9/12/2004: iMac G5 in pictures  - BBC
9/12/2004: New iMac: No box  - CNN

Internet
9/12/2004: Bug Bites - ABC
9/12/2004: How to Remove the New 'Bagle'' - ABC
9/12/2004: Another Bagle variant tries to spread  - BBC
9/12/2004: Back in the Internet saddle  - CNN

Miscellaneous
9/12/2004: Microsoft launches iTunes rival  - BBC
9/12/2004: Briefly: Burst wants Gates deposition released  - BBC
9/12/2004: Gates: "We're Early on the Video Thing" - Business Week
9/12/2004: Microsoft, the Entertainer? - Business Week

Energy:
9/12/2004: EU decision time for nuclear waste ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: BNFL nuclear freighters prepare for unjustified trans-Atlantic plutonium shipment ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: China trains int'l technicians over use of solar energy ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: Greedy solar tower ... - New Scientist
9/12/2004: US plans mobile nuclear reactor ... - New Scientist
9/12/2004: Another Dawn for Solar Power - Business Week

Health:
Cardiovascular
9/12/2004: Study Raises Concern on Benefits of Fish - ABC
9/12/2004: New Tricks for Anticholesterol Drugs? - Business Week

Cancer  
9/12/2004: Scientists Identify 'Jekyll and Hyde' Cancer Gene ... - FirstScience
9/12/2004: Studies: Radiation Not for All With Cancer - ABC
9/12/2004: Sights set on breast cancer cause  - BBC

Infectious
9/12/2004: Calif. Horse Country Wary of West Nile - ABC
9/12/2004: Tories pledge to tackle superbug  - BBC

Non-Infectious
9/12/2004: Autumn Allergies - ABC
9/12/2004: Allergy Quiz - ABC
9/12/2004: Video: Seasonal and Chronic Allergies - ABC
9/12/2004: Spanish Parliament Goes Almost Smoke-Free - ABC

Miscellaneous
9/12/2004: Mineral Rights - ABC
9/12/2004: Number of Uninsured Rises - ABC
9/12/2004: GlaxoSmithKline Starts Releasing Drug Data - ABC
9/12/2004: Alternative for dental sedation  - BBC
9/12/2004: Child abuse cases 'being missed'  - BBC
9/12/2004: Body of deceitHow steroid abuse is driving the 'muscle culture' in gyms  - BBC
9/12/2004: Pregnancy clue to cot death risk  - BBC
9/12/2004: Pig organs 'safe for humans'  - BBC
9/12/2004: Men urged to seek bladder advice
  - BBC

History, Anthropology:
9/12/2004: A Novel Method For Studying Ancient Life Forms - SpaceDaily
9/12/2004: Modularity in Development and Evolution ... - New Scientist

Miscellaneous:
9/12/2004: Satellite tracking for criminals  - BBC
9/12/2004: Star Trek's Scotty takes final bow out of public life  - BBC
9/12/2004: Anti-abortion cybersquatter loses appeal  - BBC
9/12/2004: Outsourcing's next big thing:-Malaysia?
9/12/2004: The latest protest tool: 'texting'  - CNN
9/12/2004: Big Brother says: Buy this!  - CNN
9/12/2004: Cameras and computers watch Britain  - CNN

Neurosciences:
9/12/2004: Dyslexia Not the Same in Every Culture - ABC
9/12/2004: New theory on cause of dyslexia  - BBC

Physics and Astronomy:

Prolongevity

Robotics:

Space:
9/12/2004: ET write home  - Nature
9/12/2004: China Showcases Space Program
 - Space.com
9/12/2004: You’ve Got (Alien) Mail - ABC
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Technology:
9/12/2004: Plastic magnet breaks the mold  - BBC

  



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