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  August 30, 2004

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Low-carb diets get thermodynamic defence  - Nature  The idea that eating a diet rich in protein will help you shed more pounds than one stuffed with carbs is driving a vast diet industry. But many nutritionists dispute this view, saying that a calorie is a calorie regardless of where it comes from. Formally, a calorie is the amount of energy needed to heat one kilogram of water by 1ēC. Now Richard Feinman of the State University of New York and Eugene Fine of Jacobi Medical Center in New York are turning to physics to assert that calories differ. They use the laws of thermodynamics: fundamental rules that describe how heat, work and energy change in a system. Feinman and Fine point out that protein and carbohydrate are metabolized in different ways and their energy is therefore dispersed in different forms. When protein is broken down by the body, for example, more energy is released as heat than is converted into chemical energy. But when it comes to dieting, Astrup and other experts say that Feinman is missing the point. Even if protein and carbohydrate are processed differently in the body, what really matters is whether low-carb diets actually help people lose more weight.
Seiko Epson's FR-II micro flying robot Bluetooth flying bot creates buzz  - BBC  136 mm. wide, 85 mm. tall, 12.3 gm. Two ultra-thin ultrasonic motors spin in opposite directions. Remote-controlled, it has a 32-bit microcontroller, a tiny gyro-sensor, an onboard battery pack, Bluetooth, and a digital camera. Its two tiny ultrasonic motors and itys tiny battery pack  let it buzz about for three minutes. Seiko Epson said it could be used in search and rescue operations in two years. The helicopter robot, which is lighter than a can of pop, could be used in surveillance operations or for reaching into tiny spaces to look for earthquake survivors. 

Chip, Eyewire

Door open for silicon replacement  - BBC  Japanese experts have now overcome the flaws that plague crystals of silicon carbide, a hard compound that is more robust in hot conditions. Silicon carbide (SiC) could be used to make electronic devices that can operate at high power, in fierce heat or at lethal doses of radiation. "These results are spectacular," said materials scientist Roland Madar, of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, (CNRS) in Grenoble, France. "The [layering] process is a major innovation in materials science. Silicon carbide has become, at last, a contender for silicon's crown."
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Alzheimer's Disease:

Biosciences:
8/30/2004: Geneticists engineer marathon mice  - Nature
8/30/2004: Friendly faces calm stressed sheep
  - Nature
8/30/2004: Primate shortage could slow medical advances - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Noisy ecotourists may boost bear numbers - New Scientist
8/30/2004: GM 'marathon' mice break distance records - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Nervous sheep are pleased to see ewe - New Scientist
8/30/2004: US animal rights activist barred from Britain - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Morning Light: The Frenetic Dance of the Blackbird and the Ant  - NY Times

Climate, Environment:
8/30/2004: Africa's locust crisis worsens  - Nature
8/30/2004: Canada rings the changes for study of northern birds  - Nature
8/30/2004: Global warming to devastate Europe first - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Dust storms on the rise globally - New Scientist
8/30/2004: 'Boiling Point': Who's to Blame for Global Warming  - NY Timest

Computers:
Devices

Communications

Technology
8/30/2004: Computer chips get tough  - Nature
8/30/2004: Door open for silicon replacement  - BBC

PC's

Internet
8/30/2004: DNA technique protects against 'evil' emails - New Scientist

Miscellaneous
8/30/2004: US raids net song swappers - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Commentary: For a Young Doctor, the Ultimate Sacrifice  - NY Times
8/30/2004: Cases: After a Multitude of Tests, an Answer From Grandmother's Memory  - NY Times
8/30/2004: The Politics of Emergency Contraception  - NY Times

Energy:
8/30/2004: Sunflower oil 'could be used to run cars' - New Scientist

Health:
Cardiovascular
8/30/2004: Blood Pressure Rates on Rise Again in U.S.  - NY Times

Cancer  
8/30/2004: Breast cancer drug gets helpmate  - Nature

Infectious
8/30/2004: Pigs test positive for bird flu  - Nature
8/30/2004: Bird flu data languish in Chinese journals  - Nature
8/30/2004: Polio hits Guinea and Mali  - Nature
8/30/2004: Synthetic drug offers malaria hope - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Leukaemia risk for kids living near petrol stops - New Scientist
8/30/2004: African polio outbreak breaks through 'firewall' - New Scientist
8/30/2004: US government preps for flu pandemic
  - CNN

Non-Infectious
8/30/2004: Cigarettes more polluting than diesel exhaust - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Vital Signs: Prevention: Fighting the Sources of Asthma  - NY Times

Miscellaneous
8/30/2004: Low-carb diets get thermodynamic defence  - Nature
8/30/2004: Unused back muscles switch themselves off - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Childbirth: Building Muscles for the Big Day  - NY Times
8/30/2004: Books on Health: A Kind of Firefighting  - NY Times
8/30/2004: The Claim: Running Increases the Risk of Osteoarthritis  - NY Times
8/30/2004: Vital Signs: Treatments: Lowering Patients' Blood Sugar  - NY Times
8/30/2004: Vital Signs: Performance: What Jump-Starts an Athlete?  - NY Times

History, Anthropology:

Miscellaneous:
8/30/2004: The common good  - Nature
8/30/2004: The accidental spy  - Nature
8/30/2004: Doctors implicated in abuse of Iraqi prisoners - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Doomsday wreck in Thames could blow - New Scientist

Neurosciences:
8/30/2004: Tribe without names for numbers cannot count  - Nature
8/30/2004: Lop-sided features linked to temper  - Nature
8/30/2004: Analysis highlights suicide risk of antidepressants  - Nature
8/30/2004: While you were sleeping  - Nature
8/30/2004: Language may shape human thought - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Weird links with words and colours in the mind - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Chaotic homes hamper child development

Physics and Astronomy:
8/30/2004: Sedna 'has invisible moon'  - Nature
8/30/2004: Jets expelled by star shed light on explosion
  - Nature
8/30/2004: Stunt pilots to hook falling stardust sample
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Unique moon may partner Sedna
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Asteroid shaves past Earth's atmosphere
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Tiny telescopes discover distant planet
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: First 'super Earth' planet found
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Biggest bets in the universe unveiled
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Q & A: The Physics of Soup
  - NY Times

Prolongevity
8/30/2004: Impaired clock genes boost fly sex times - New Scientist

Robotics:

Space:
8/30/2004: Beagle 2 bites back  - Nature
8/30/2004: Return to Flight
  - Nature
8/30/2004: Mars Odyssey to voyage into future - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Beagle 2's demise remains a mystery
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Martian teardrop carved in crater
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Radar to scan shuttle for launch debris
 - New Scientist
8/30/2004: On Mars, More Water From Pricey Plumbing
  - NY Times
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Technology:
8/30/2004: Bluetooth flying bot creates buzz   - BBC
8/30/2004: Superconductor beats copper in plans for particle collider  - Nature
8/30/2004: Crash victims' head injuries spotted by 'pupilometer' - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Golf ball polymer 'heals' bullet holes - New Scientist
8/30/2004: Space technology could give comfy Antarctic homes - New Scientist

  



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