8/6/2004:

Intermediate Word: 
vamp
  (a) seductive woman  (b) tool used to remove a tire  (c) steetcar receipt  (d) archer's bowstring armguard
Difficult Word: - lampion   (a) type of mollusc  (b) oil-burning outdoor lamp  (c) lamp rheostat  (d) calcimine light

 

Transplant hope for stroke sufferers  - Nature  Left:  Human fetal stem-cells turned into neurons when injected into rats' brains.  Transplants of human fetal stem-cells may help repair stroke-induced brain damage. This has long been a goal of stem-cell researchers, and now a study in rats has produced the most promising result yet, by showing that grafted cells can home in on injured brain regions and form replacement nerve cells. The next step is to prove that the cells can reverse paralysis in the rodents, before moving on to primate and human trials. Steinberg's team took neural stem-cells from 16- to 20-week-old human fetuses and cultured them with growth-promoting chemicals to generate millions of cells for transplantation. Steinberg's team took neural stem-cells from 16- to 20-week-old human fetuses and cultured them with growth-promoting chemicals to generate millions of cells for transplantation. The remaining cells still looked like stem cells or had turned into astrocytes, a type of brain cell that supports neurons. Some grafted cells had migrated a millimetre or more.

Biosensors Of Diabetics and Shoplifters - ABC  Left:  Researchers at Penn State University are developing this roughly dime-sized implant that can monitor blood glucose levels in diabetics using technology simlar to that found in the tiny plastic anti-theft systems used to protect retail merchandise.  Researchers at Penn State University have been working on developing a tiny sensor that could be implanted under a patient's skin to monitor the blood's chemistry and wirelessly report back its findings. "I was thinking about how those anti-theft markers work," says Grimes. "Effectively what you have there is a passive sensor that costs about next to nothing to produce, yet can be monitored over a large area.

Miner at pithead   BBC

Carbon store 'could free UK coal'  - BBC  The UK could secure its energy supply for many decades if it could use its huge reserves of coal, scientists say. They want the government to give high priority to developing ways to store carbon dioxide underground, to allow it to exploit its abundant coal deposits. They say the other priority should be to build a new generation of nuclear power plants to meet demand for power. "There's 10 times as much coal as the oil and gas reserves we have. The Russians told me they're going to build more nuclear plants, because they can't rely on oil and gas - and it's their oil and gas we're planning to rely on!"





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