8/23/2004:

Intermediate Word: 
spikenard
  (a) spiked barrier to cavalry  (b) costly ointment of antiquity   (c) iron maiden  (d) emblem of the bengal Lancers
Difficult Word: - morello   (a) sour cherry  (b) eel in the Indian Ocean  (c) Saracen javelin thrower  (d) Indonesian fruit

Keeping Current With Ocean Currents - SpaceDaily  Take Captain Karl Greig, for example, who skippers a large anchor-handling towing supply boat in the Gulf of Mexico. Greig needs up-to-the minute information on ocean currents and now he can get it, thanks to near real-time ocean altimetry. Greig now regularly taps into the Web site of the University of Colorado's Center for Astrodynamics Research, where the latest satellite measurements of sea surface height are used to create maps showing the location, direction and speed of currents in the Gulf of Mexico. Greig needs up-to-the minute information on ocean currents and now he can get it, thanks to near real-time ocean altimetry. Greig now regularly taps into the Web site of the University of Colorado's Center for Astrodynamics Research, where the latest satellite measurements of sea surface height are used to create maps showing the location, direction and speed of currents in the Gulf of Mexico. 
December 3 Gamma-Ray Burst Was A New Type Of Cosmic Explosion - SpaceDaily  Left: Astronomers have now seen "haloes" around an extremely powerful, distant "headlight", a gamma-ray burst which occurred for about 30 seconds on December 3, 2003. The GRB was detected by the INTEGRAL observatory and soon afterwards, an X-ray "afterglow" from the GRB was observed by XMM-Newton observatory. As the afterglow was observed through the disk of our Galaxy, sheets of dust in the Galaxy scattered the X-rays and produced the halo. Four images of the "GRB halo", obtained 25, 35, 45, and 55 thousand seconds after the GRB, are shown above. The X-ray afterglow from the GRB is at the center of each halo. The haloes seem to be expanding, but this is an optical illusion; it simply takes a bit longer for the X-rays to be scattered by the more distant dust. Credit: ESA, S. Vaughan (University of Leicester) Online reference  Astronomers have identified a new class of cosmic explosions that are more powerful than supernovae but considerably weaker than most gamma-ray bursts. The discovery strongly suggests a continuum between the two previously-known classes of explosions. 

Chandra Contributes To ESA's Integral Detection Of Closest Gamma-Ray Burst - SpaceDaily  A gamma-ray burst detected by ESA's Integral gamma-ray observatory on 3 December 2003 has been thoroughly studied for months by an armada of space and ground-based observatories. Astronomers have now concluded that this event, called GRB 031203, is the closest cosmic gamma-ray burst on record, and also the faintest. This also suggests that an entire population of sub-energetic gamma-ray bursts has so far gone unnoticed. "The idea that all GRBs spit out the same amount of gamma rays, or that they are 'standard candles' as we call them, is simply ruled out by the new data," 





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