8/21/2004:

Intermediate Word: 
poniard
  (a) pony bridle  (b) footman   (c) milky alcoholic drink  (d) dagger
Difficult Word: - brasserie   (a) French ladies' undergarment boutique  (b) percussion section  (c) beer joint  (d) chutzpah

Spooky Spaceflight - SpaceDaily  In brief, the idea is to apply quantum entanglement to ion propulsion. An ion drive system is a form of rocket propulsion which uses a stream of charged particles, or ions, as a rocket exhaust. Were two specimens of cesium to be entangled on earth, and  one of the specimens lofted into space, then exciting the earthbound cesium sample to produce ions would result in the space-traveling cesium sample becoming energetically excited and producing ions like its earthbound counterpart. A resulting ion stream, produced without the benefi of any form of internal engine system onboard the spacecraft, could propel the craft through space. While an entangled laser fusion drive would not accelerate a spacecraft to the speeds attainable by a telephotonic drive, or even a teleportation drive, I suspect that it is more immediately realizable from a practical engineering standpoint than either of those propulsion concepts.
Image of brain Work 'may ward off Alzheimer's'  - BBC  Left:  An estimated 700,000 Britons have dementia.  People who have mentally demanding jobs may be less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease later in life, a study suggests. The study found that most people had jobs with about the same level of mental demands when they were in their 20s. Those who did not have Alzheimer's went on to do more mentally demanding jobs. Those who went on to be diagnosed with the disease did not. "Variations in income, access to healthcare, better nutrition and other factors related to socio-economic status could be responsible in part for our findings," said Dr Smyth.

Image of robotic surgery

Robot-assisted kidney transplants  - BBC    UK surgeons plan to use a robot to carry out key-hole kidney transplants for the first time. Surgeons at London's Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital have already used the 1million da Vinci robot to carry out prostate and bladder surgery. They will now learn from experienced US surgeons how to use the robot to operate on the kidney. The robot's pencil-sized probes translate the surgeon's hand movements, allowing precision work without tremor. His hands are strapped with Velcro to joysticks that control the robotic 'fingers', which carry out the same movements. This should allow the operation to be carried out through a much smaller incision





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