8/20/2005:

Intermediate Word:  homburg(a) variation on hamburger  (b) out-of-the-way town  (c) tool to separate ties from their rims  (d) man's felt hat
Difficult Word: - Lag b'Omer  (a) The "Little People"  (b) Jewish holiday  (c) hero of Welsh legend  (d) Irish lake

Cluster makes turbulent breakthrough - PhysicsWeb   A team of European scientists has discovered a new type of vortex in the Earth's magnetosphere. The drift-kinetic Alfvén vortices seen by the team measure tens of kilometres across and were discovered in data from the Cluster mission. Last year another group discovered Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, which are several thousands of kilometres across, in data from the same mission. The results could help shed more light on the effects of turbulence in space plasmas.     
Study May Expand Applied Benefits Of Super-Hard Ceramics - SpaceDaily   Left:  The particular nanostructured ceramic Szlufarska focuses on, called nanocrystalline silicon carbide, is also exceptionally resistant to high temperature and radiation, which has NASA eyeing it as a coating for the space shuttle.  The particular nanostructured ceramic Szlufarska focuses on, called nanocrystalline silicon carbide, is also exceptionally resistant to high temperature and radiation, which has NASA eyeing it as a coating for the space shuttle. Unlike other exceptionally hard materials, these advanced ceramics tend to bend rather than break, meaning they could be shaped into extremely long-lasting yet lightweight parts for everything from automobile engines and high-speed machining tools to medical implants in the body. But they are also notoriously difficult to engineer. 

On The Horizon: A 'Rinse' For Washing Machines That  Dries Clothes - SpaceDaily  University of Florida engineers have developed a compound that forces clothes in the washer to shed 20 percent more water during the spin cycle than in normal conditions. Their invention: A water-shedding compound created from a mix of common detergents and fabric softeners. The result: A load of clothes dries faster in the dryer, saving energy — and reducing homeowners’ electricity bills and time spent in the laundry room. Shah and Daniel Carter, a doctoral student in chemical engineering, will publish their second article about their research this month in Langmuir, a surface science journal. UF has applied for a patent on the research, which was funded with $200,000 from Procter & Gamble, a major manufacturer of laundry detergent and related products. Carter and Shah said the researchers’ key insight was that the spaces between tiny fibers in the weave of fabrics comprise minute tubes, or capillaries, which retain water due to surface tension.   Their experiments revealed that one ratio of a common detergent and fabric softener – five parts detergent, one part fabric softener – added before the spin cycle forced the clothes to shed 20 percent more water than untreated clothes. The clothes then dried 20 percent faster. A conservative 10 percent reduction in drying times would save consumers $266 million annually. But Shah and Carter say they can do better than that. 




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