7/28/2005:

Intermediate Word:  dressage -  (a) subtly guiding horses through their maneuvers  (b) general apparel preferences  (c) proper term for poultry stuffing  (d) self-adhering dressing for a wound 
Difficult Word: - analeptic  (a) arriving at an answer through a sudden burst of insight  (b) profound  (c) restorative  (d) in a trance-like state

Between Series, an Actress Became a Superstar (in Math)  - NY Times  Left: Ms. McKellar, now a semiregular on "The West Wing" playing a White House speechwriter, Elsie Snuffin, is probably the only person on prime-time television who moonlights as a cyberspace math tutor.   On her Web site, Danica McKellar  takes on questions that require more than a moment's thought to answer. Ms. McKellar, now a semiregular on "The West Wing" playing a White House speechwriter, Elsie Snuffin, is probably the only person on prime-time television who moonlights as a cyberspace math tutor. As a math major at the University of California, Los Angeles, she pondered making a career move to professional mathematician. "I love that stuff," Ms. McKellar said last month during a visit to Manhattan after a play-reading in the Hamptons. Her conversation was peppered with terminology like "epsilons" and "limsups" (pronounced "lim soups"). She may also be the only actress, now or ever, to prove a new mathematical theorem, one that bears her name. Certainly, she is the only theorem prover who appears wearing black lingerie in the July issue of Stuff magazine. Even in that interview, she mentioned math. For a simple model of magnetism, Professor Chayes thought that they might be able to prove a property that would indicate when the magnetic field would line up in a certain direction. Professor Chayes tutored the two women (Danica and Brandy Winn) for months on the background knowledge they would need. Then the students spent months more, up to 12 hours a day, working on the proof. 
Hunting for Life in Specks of Cosmic Dust  - NY Times  Teams of astronomers are staying up all night in the breath-fogging cold of the high-altitude desert of Chile and in the oxygen-starved heights of Hawaiian volcanoes, deciphering downloaded pixels from the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes over soggy pizza, and then upstaging one another's news conferences, all in the search for the smallest, dimmest crumbs of creation, the most mundane specks of dust that may be circling some garden-variety star. It is here, in boring, peaceful meadows of the galaxy, far from fountains of lethal high energy particles, swarms of killer comets or hungry black holes, we are told, that we should look if we want to find habitable abodes and possibly life. Last spring the quest ratcheted another notch downward (or upward) when a team of astronomers announced the detection of a planet only seven times the mass of the Earth circling a dim star named Gliese 876 in the constellation Aquarius.   

US, Australia, India, China and SKorea To Sign New Climate Pact - SpaceDaily  A group of countries including the United States, Australia, China, India and South Korea have agreed a secret pact on greenhouse gas emissions to replace the Kyoto climate protocol, a report said Wednesday. The alliance, which is yet to be announced, will bring together nations that account for more than 40 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, The Australian newspaper said. A government source told AFP that the general thrust of the report was correct, but that the line-up of countries involved had not been finalised.    




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