6/12/2006:

Intermediate Word:  Cretaceous (a) Chalk cliffs of Dover  (b) class of molluscs that produce calcium-based chells  (c) second period of the Paleozoic Era  (d) last period of the Mesozoic
Difficult Word:
  degust - (a) savor  (b) exhale  (c) rebel  (d) swing sails to leeward

Power station Bosses urging Blair to curb CO2  - BBC  Thirteen business leaders are set to meet Prime Minister Tony Blair to urge tougher action on climate change. The group, including Shell, Tesco and Vodafone executives, will urge more curbs on carbon dioxide emissions. They believe this would encourage innovation that would give British business an edge with new technology. They believe this would encourage innovation that would give British business an edge with new technology. Other business lobby groups have argued against stricter targets in the past, saying they would damage the competitiveness of Britain.    
2M1207 system (ESO) Mini-planet systems get stranger  - BBC  Mini planetary systems may orbit cosmic objects that are 100 times smaller than our Sun, research suggests. Discs of gas and dust, the ingredients needed to create such systems, have been seen circling these relatively small objects, dubbed "planemos". Located about 450 light-years away in a star-forming region, four of the objects are just a few million years old, making them cosmic "newborns". They have masses between five and 15 times that of Jupiter. But unlike Jupiter, these objects are floating through space without an accompanying star.    

Image: HIV virus

Scientists get inside look at viruses - MSNBC  Left:  A new 3-D image shows the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, and the protein spikes on its surface that match up with host cells.  Scientists at Florida State University recently produced a new 3-D image of HIV and the protein spikes on its surface that match up with host cells. The pictures may help researchers better understand how the virus fuses with a host T-cell and inspire new ways to design vaccines. Until now,  the design details of the spikes and their distribution pattern on the surface of the virus membrane have been poorly understood, which has limited our understanding of how the virus infection actually occurs, and frustrated efforts to create vaccines."   




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