6/12/2004:

Intermediate Word: 
toque
  (a) heavy metal necklace  (b) lever arm that actuates a steam whistle  (c)  hat   (d) sleeveless blouse 
Difficult Word: - remarque  (a) mark in margin of engraving  (b) remark  (c) reviewer's critique  (d) re-issuance of letter of marque

New Moon Shot Not So Costly - SpaceDaily  NASA's plan to fulfill President George W. Bush's space exploration effort suggests the agency will have to spend about $64 billion over the next 15 years to send U.S. astronauts back to the moon. Although the price tag -- projected in fiscal year 2003 dollars -- excludes several elements of the Bush space plan, it is far less than the hundreds of billions critics of the proposal have suggested it would cost. NASA's figures indicate the cost of designing, building and flying the new Crew Exploration Vehicle -- the spacecraft NASA is developing to supersede its aging shuttle fleet -- to the moon would total $24 billion. A companion spacecraft that could set down on the moon's surface would cost $40 billion more. Both figures assume the cost of a manned landing on the moon no later than 2020, and include the cost of developing rocket boosters to launch both ships and of managing the project.
Columbia To Start Major Tree-Ring Climate Research Study - SpaceDaily  The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded the Tree-Ring Laboratory of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, a $5.5 million grant to study one of the largest climate systems affecting the globe--the Asian monsoon climate system. This five-year study will apply the science of tree-ring analysis (dendrochronology) and its application to the study of past climate to key questions regarding the processes that drive the development of the monsoon and its various characteristics through different regions. The Asian monsoon is one of the most important modes of natural climate variability on Earth, with differing regional impacts over areas extending from Africa to Australasia, northward into central Asia, and to the Pacific Ocean. Dozens of countries and nearly half the global population are affected by the climate variability it brings. 

Scientists Prepare To Place Einstein On The Rim Of A Black Hole - SpaceDaily  It may soon be sink-or-swim time for Albert Einstein. Scientists are preparing for the ultimate test of Einstein's law of gravity, known as the theory of general relativity, through a systematic, in-depth study of hundreds of black holes. The goal is to study the effect of gravity on time, matter and energy where gravity is most pronounced: at the theoretical border of a black hole called the event horizon. Scientists know where to look, and now they are building the tools needed to do it. One proposed mission that could do this, Miller said, is the Constellation X-ray Observatory.





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