4/17/2004:

Intermediate Word:  demarche  (a) after marching, preparing for battle  (b) border buffer zone  (c) gauche  (d) protest
Difficult Word: - retrorse  (a) arrogant  (b) turned backward  (c) top-heavy  (d) resisting change


Congress Warms To New Space Plan - SpaceDaily  In the 1983 movie, "The Right Stuff," astronaut Gordo Cooper points toward a space capsule and asks a NASA scientist, "Do you know what makes this bird go up?" Cooper answers his own question: "Funding makes this bird go up!" At which point, astronaut Gus Grissom chimes in: "No bucks? No 'Buck Rogers!'" That alleged conversation took place more than four decades ago, during the height of the space race with the Soviet Union. Today, the same refrain applies. Without funding from Congress, no U.S. spaceship will blast off for anywhere. The plan is undeniably bold, but many of the politicians who will have to write the checks have been cool, indifferent, even hostile to it.
Internet2 May Change The Way Scientists Conduct Research - SpaceDaily  Left: "Instead of being restricted to one or two scientists working for a few hours within the small confines of a human-operated vehicle," said Ballard, "scientists using remotely-operated vehicles (ROVs) connected to Internet2 could spend an unlimited about of time on the bottom and share, in real-time, their observations with colleagues around the world."  When Dr. Robert Ballard went on a scientific expedition to Black Sea this past summer, he was able to take with him virtually any scientist or student who wanted to go. With the capability of Internet2 and a high bandwidth satellite link, scientists, for the first time, were able to work on the ocean floor from the comfort of their university laboratories. Ballard explains in the article that two remotely operated vehicles working at or near the bottom of the Black Sea transmitted eight underwater video images and five acoustic signals via fiber optic cable up to the ships command/control center. Six video signals, including two high-definition images and three two-way audio channels, were transmitted off the ship via satellite, were received by an antenna in the US, and placed on Internet2.

Smart cars to warn drowsy-drivers  - CNN  Ford spokesman Mike Vaughn said they tested computerized optical scanning and a variety of warnings: a vibrating steering wheel, the sound of a car driving over rumble strips and a visual warning projected on the windshield. Researchers also tested a so-called "active" system in which the vehicle would actually adjust the steering automatically if it veered too far one way or the other. "We're confident we can do it in ways that drivers will accept," Greenberg said. "The new system will be adaptive and intelligent." Luxury carmaker Infiniti said last month it will begin offering lane-departure warning systems in vehicles later this year, the first use of such accident-avoidance technology in North American passenger cars.





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