1/8/2005:

Intermediate Word:  burnoose -  (a) small feral Asiatic mammal  (b) a type of hoop cheese  (c) hangman's knot  (d) hooded Arab cloak
Difficult Word: - galatea  (a) Egyptian goddess of the hearth  (b) female slave  (c) durable striped cloth  (d) anise-based alcoholic beverage
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Image of the brain  Cells repair Parkinson's damage  - BBC  Monkey stem cells can repair the brain damage caused by Parkinson's disease, Japanese researchers have shown. The researchers said: "These results suggest that transplantation using embryonic stem cells as a clinical therapy for Parkinson's disease is approaching the point of technical feasibility." The researchers said: "These results suggest that transplantation using embryonic stem cells as a clinical therapy for Parkinson's disease is approaching the point of technical feasibility." But they said a number of safety and efficacy concerns still needed addressing.  
Haast's eagle hunted moa, the herbivorous, flightless birds of New Zealand [now also extinct], which weighed up to 200kgs (31st 7lb) Huge eagles 'dominated NZ skies'  - BBC  the Haast's eagle weighed between 10kgs (22 pounds) and 14kgs (31 pounds) - between 30% and 40% heavier than the largest living bird of prey alive today, the harpy eagle of Latin America, and was approaching the upper weight limit for powered flight. "With a truncated wingspan of around three metres, for flying under the forest canopy, the eagles struck their prey from the side, tearing into the pelvic flesh and gripping the bone with claws the size of a tiger's paw. "They hunted moa, the herbivorous, flightless birds of New Zealand [now also extinct], which weighed up to 200kgs (440 lb)."   

Image: Virgin GlobalFlyer

Round-the-world flight nears ‘go’ time - MSNBC   If all goes according to flight plan, an exotic-looking aircraft will be piloted into the history books this month. Rolling down one of the longest runways in North America, GlobalFlyer’s itinerary is nothing short of nonstop. That is, stay airborne using onboard fuel and circumnavigate the world. Winging through the skies at speeds of more than 285 mph (250 knots, or 456 kilometers per hour), the craft’s flight should be completed inside 80 hours. GlobalFlyer is powered by a single turbofan jet engine, fed by 13 separate fuel tanks on the aircraft. 




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