1/27/2005:

Intermediate Word:  gyre (a) spiral  (b faulty legal proceeding  (c) jail  (d) to crawfish
Difficult Word: -Hestia -  (a)
  queen of Ireland when the Romans arrived  (b) city in Samothrace  (c) goddess of the hearth  (d) heroine of Plautus' play, "The Sabine Women"

Earth's Limited Supply of Metals Raises Concern - Space.com  If all nations were to use the same services enjoyed in developed nations, even the full extraction of metals from the Earth's crust and extensive recycling may not be enough to meet metal demands in the future. According to the study, all of the copper in ore, plus all of the copper currently in use, would be required to bring the world to the level of the developed nations for power transmission, construction and other services and products that depend on the metal.    
Experiment probes climate riddle  - BBC  A three-week experiment to resolve the biggest riddle in climate science begins in Australia on Thursday. Scientists will use radar, aeroplanes, weather balloons and a ship to study the life cycle of tropical clouds. Current projections of global temperature rise, reported in the last assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), see increases by the end of the century that range from 1.4 to 5.8C. The spread of possible temperatures represents a huge uncertainty. One of the key issues centres on a poor understanding of what goes on inside clouds... how clouds form and carry heat high up into the atmosphere. 

Cell transplant may cure diabetes  - BBC  Trials of a new treatment for diabetes could lead to a cure for the disease within 10 years, researchers say. "Also in the long term by reversing diabetes we hope that we will prevent the long-term conditions of the disease which develop 20 to 30 years later such as blindness and kidney failure." Currently, the cell transplant requires high doses of anti-rejection drugs which present a danger to children. So before they can even by trialled in young people, a process where these drugs are not needed has to be developed, Mr Johnson said. His team acknowledges that the process is still "quite inefficient". 




1/26/2006 Daily Page
1/25/2006 Daily Page
1/24/2006 Daily Page
1/23/2006 Daily Page
1/22/2006 Daily Page
1/21/2006 Daily Page
1/20/2006 Daily Page